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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get invved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we didn't succeed. >> rose: you could not change the direction. >> we lost three to two. the election officials wanted to believe the vendors over us because the vendors assured them everything is safe. >> rose: and there was your appointment to the international workshop on international voting president clinton, this book ki
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
sciences. >> this is a company i don't recommend stocks on a take overbasis. i don't like the fundamentals at sce. let's go to greg in new hampshire. greg? >> caller: jim, big boo-yah. >> hey, greg. >> caller: how do you like questcor? >> you can't. now they added this dividend and that's terrific, but they were not as -- let's say they really made you feel great about the situation before they should have. how about that? let's go to sam in missouri. sam? >>. >> caller: jim, thank you for taking my all. osur. >> everyone is selling it off now because the drug is selling and no one is selling. all the anticipation is going. i like the stock at 10. i think it's cheap. let's go to robin in california. robin? >> caller: hello, jim. diagoe. >> if that come downs, that's the danny walker family and they're doing quite well. >> caller: hey, jim cramer, i wanted to wish you a big boo-yah. >> thank you, same. >> caller: i want to know how do you feel about esrx? >> express scripts, that merger -- >> buy, buy, buy! >> that stock doesn't come in. when it does come in, i need you to pull the trigger.
does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you could answer the question one way or the other. the important thing to take with them it is -- [inaudible] nobody wants to run for office so they can -- a robot into the you what to be a candidate because you believe in something. whatever you want to do. nobody wants you to just pull the lever for what the constituents you to do. so all a super pac and would do is identify places where the elected representative has gone too far from his constituency, and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion and the people. so you take that crossroads add, we're running it in all the states talk about the president has had this tennis program. testing this thing was wildly unpopular, and all the ads is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they did. it can't change public opinion about the stimulus legislation that we can iden
,000 new math and science teachers and create two million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is it too high. i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking advantage of 25%. i also want to close those loopholes that are get -- giving incentives for companies shipping overseas. i want to provide tax rates for companies here in the united states. governor romney and i both agree that we have to boost american energy production, and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we have to look at the energy source of the future, like wind, solar, and biofuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. in order for us to do it, we have to close our deficit. one of the things i'm sure we'll be discussing tonight is how do we deal with our tax code and how do we make sure we are reducing spending in a re
been a strong category. and it continues to be. the sciences are strong. >> any negative implications from these numbers? >> the negative would be the part-time work. it's going to come back to this part-time work number. if you're working part time and that job for example, goes away or alternatively you're getting paid less than what you really need to survive, then obviously people are going to not be able to spend and be part of the economy like we want them. but another big part of the numbers is the 3.5 million job openings that do exist in this country. every time i speak to business leaders, they tell me one of the biggest issues facing the economy going forward is the skills gap that we see. there aren't enough people studying science engineering in this country to fill those jobs. >> stay with us rebecca. >>> we want to go now to nancy cordes at the white house with a question of how this is playing on the campaign trail. nancy, good morning. >> good morning to you charlie. the obama campaign and aides here at the white house will be thrilled by this numb
really liked it a lot. quickly last week, looper is one heck of a science fiction film with bruce willis and joseph cordon. >> you would give it how many stars? >> 3 1/2 stars. one of the best of the year. >> go o's. hey, what are you drinkin'? pumpkin coffee for the morning. and i've got my pumpkin k-cup packs for at home. now i can have my pumpkin coffee any time i want it. pumpkin's perfect. it's dunkin' with the press of a button. new pumpkin k-cup packs, only at dunkin' restaurants. america runs on dunkin' coffee. i'm drinking dunkin'. i'm just in love with the flavor. i get mine black. i don't want to take away from that pure taste. so smooth, no bitterness. it's awesome. there's no other taste like it. america runs on dunkin' coffee. >>> ravens set to travel healthy and rested to kansas with sunday's showdown with the chiefs. ravens heading out on the road looking for their first win ton road this season after losing their first away game in week two. this time around ray rice hope thats the outcome is significantly different than it was against the eagles. ravens learned a year a
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
at a typewriter or a scientist thinking hard but what about having the science? and for him as a composer it was exciting because he wanted his music to evolve knowing about this. it represent this is extra dimension. so he does electronic music to have something that parallels that. for me i tried to explain all these complicated threads that led us to where we were today and the idea of having these many different voices, the voices of people and the visuals i realized what a rich forum opera is. we think of it as in the past but it's such a rich way to convey the sense of an idea, what's going on spchlt and the idea that it was going to premier at the pompidou center made it that much more attractive. >> are there similarities and scientific creativity and artistic creative any >> you know, there really are in many ways and i'm always intrigued by how a t of the good people in the arts are problem solvers the same way they're problem solvers, they're trying to get from one point to another and they're trying to find the route to do it. in fact, a work together with an artist on an art
years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >>
was held up the wilson center in june on science and technology and innovation. the symposia, which the institute co-chairs foot china's state council, not only promote dialogue among the stakeholders but allow the participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china security perceptions, and other big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last month we published the u.s. cooperation and clean energy and the review of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan is there a regional and gamecocks the story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned we get organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks to the and we hadn't cleared the names with him. he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks
and science teachers to improve our education, doubling our exports, all those things that will help create jobs as we move forward and strengthen our economy. i was struck by kevin's answer about the fact that once again the romney campaign says they really don't have time to discuss the specifics of their tax plan. and, you know, this is a $5 trillion tax cut for the wealthy. >> we also haven't heard the specifics of what the president prepared to do in terms of spending cuts as well. >> i don't think that's true. if you look at the budget plan that the president is outlining, $4 trillion spending cut plan that deals with making sure that our tax code is fair and that those that are on the upper end of that tax code are pay iing a little bit more. let's be clear, mitt romney's $5 trillion tax plan isn't hard to explain because of the time. it's hard to explain because of the math. the math doesn't add up. $5 trillion isn't paid for. what that requires, as economic studies have shown, is that mitt romney will have to raise taxes on middle class families. >> speaking of middle class familie
as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bart is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership is part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. william kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. purchaser is not view of the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education, bill bennett. he also served to john mccain. all of these t-bill regularly on fox news sunday in the fox news channel. i actually met ellen 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he's accomplished since that time. so the question i would like to pose for each of you, and i'll start with governor huntsman. what does the 2012 election reveal about the respective leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much. >> okay, what this panel -- >> see you later. >> you can extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that might be instructive. he isn't
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>and now to my point. that is a whole bunch of bunk! the powerful my steal an election but they cannot steal democracy. bloc [♪ theme music ♪] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's a the "stephanie miller show"! ♪ i'm walking on sunshine, woe ho ♪ ♪ i'm walking on sunshine, woe ho ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good, hey all right now. it's time to feel good. >> stephanie: yaw hoo, it is the "stephanie miller show." wow, check me out. look at this. >> what. >> stephanie: the former white house director of foreign affairs -- >> that sounds fancy. >> stephanie: right. >> to talk about mitt romney's foreign policy speech. [ wah wah ] . >> yeah. >> stephanie: it probably would have been devastating if any of it were true. that sounds bad. the president signed no foreign trade agreements at all? wow, that sounds horrible. >> except for the ones he did sign. [ bell chimes ] [ applause ] >> stephanie: and the other areas where his policy is exactly the cam
. on the other hand, rocket science is hard, and this is only the fourth launch of the falcon 9, spaceand should use this as a learning opportunity to strengthen the design of their vehicle. jon: well, it's actually a picture-perfect launch except for that, except for that explosion. you think that they will learn from it, they'll, you know, figure out whatever the problem was and the space program, the international space station supply program will continue on as intended? >> well, there are two people at nasa, the head of the human space flight division and the space station program, they have to both approve the results coming out of spacex to insure that they understand this failure, they put a corrective fix in, and they'll bless this fix. and if nasa's not satisfied, of course, they'll go back to the drawing boards until the test program shows it's safe to fly again. jon: tom jones, former astronaut for nasa, thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure, jon. jenna: doing what cheerleaders do best. jon: what? jenna: one of the things. the incredible video of a texas teen on a flipping frenzy
in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or with a constituent thinks is right? you could give to the question one way or another. the important thing to take away from that is there is tension between the elected representative wants to do and what the constituent wants to do. no one wants to run from office so they can cast a lever from what the constituents to do. you want to be a candidate because you believe in something. nobody wants to just pull the lever for what the constituents want to do. all a super pak really can do is identify places where the election representative has gone out too far from the constituency and educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion of the people. take that advertisements the crossroads ran and were running in the states talking about how the president passed a stimulus program. the stimulus was widely -- wildly unpopular. all they can do is hold the president or another elected official and account for what they did. it cannot change public opinion about st
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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